Vote for Angus Macpherson on Thursday 5th May 2015.

Police and Crime Commissioner Elections

PCCs have real power: they hire and fire Chief Constables, they control police budgets running to hundreds of millions of pounds, and they set the local priorities for policing in their area. 

That’s why these elections for Police and Crime Commissioners are so important. People can vote for a candidate who promises the world but delivers unsafe streets and wasted money. Who cuts local policing and raises taxes for hardworking people.

Or they can vote for a Conservative PCC: someone who will work with the Government to deliver lower crime and safer communities, all while providing effective use of police resources.

Vote Conservative for a PCC who will work with the Government to deliver safer communities and responsible financial management

Conservative PCCs will work effectively with the Government to secure better policing for their communities. A Conservative PCC will use their position to improve policing and make their communities safer by working with the Government to reduce crime. The candidates of other parties will use this position to score political points against the Government.

For this reason, they are best placed to protect police funding and secure investment in counter-terrorism capabilities. At the Spending Review, Conservative PCCs proved they are better placed to lobby Government to protect police funding and invest in firearms and counter-terrorism policing.

Conservative PCCs have been more efficient in delivering effective policing

Labour and Independent PCCs have increased the police precept by more than Conservative PCCs. On average from 2012/13 to 2015/16 Labour have increased the police precept by 2.1 per cent annually and Independent by 1.9 per cent.  Conservative PCCs have only increased the precept by 1.4 per cent.[1]

Conservative PCCs have been more successful at protecting police officer numbers than Labour and Independent PCCs. From September 2012 to September 2015 police numbers on average fell by 8 per cent in police forces with Labour PCCs and 6 per cent in those with Independent PCCs, more than the 5 per cent decline in police forces with Conservative PCCs.[2]

Labour and Independent PCCs have cut almost one in five and over one in four local police officers respectively. From March 2012 to March 2015 Independent and Labour PCCs have cut neighbourhood police officers by an average of 29 per cent and 17 per cent respectively, against a fall of only 2 per cent in police forces with a Conservative PCC

Conservative PCCs have increased the number of firearms officers whereas Labour PCCs have cut them. From March 2012 to March 2015 the total number of firearms officers in police forces with a Conservative PCC has increased from 973 to 1,013 whereas in police forces with a Labour PCC it has decreased from 1,185 to 1,098

[1] DCLG, Council Tax levels set by local authorities in England, 15 July 2015, link.

[2] Home Office, Police workforce England and Wales statistics, 28 January 2016, link.